[blog] Open Research Award: Celebrating openness … and randomness?

Recently, the Open Science Community Groningen (OSCG) and the University of Groningen Library (UB) collaboratively set up a yearly returning Open Research Award, with the first awards being awarded October 2020. The goal of the Open Research Award is to (1) raise awareness and promote Open Research [1] practices, for example, pre-registration or Open Access publishing; (2) and incentivize incorporating Open Research in research by acknowledging and rewarding it. In this blog, we will play devil’s advocate so that we can cover pros and cons of introducing an Open Research Award and its uptake of a modified lottery.

Continue reading “[blog] Open Research Award: Celebrating openness … and randomness?”

[Blog] Silly… and unethical scientists

Silly… and unethical scientists

When scientists and non-scientists are confronted with similar problems, you may expect those smart scientists to handle the problems more sensibly than non-scientists. However, in this blog, I show that the opposite may be true and that scientists all too often go for solutions that are silly… and unethical. Continue reading “[Blog] Silly… and unethical scientists”

23 January 2019: ReproducibiliTea #19: How to code like a pro – Workshop Henk van der Veen

Preparation: follow these steps, (approx. 15 min):  https://hampei.github.io/rstuff/install_quick.html & bring your laptop!

Thursday, January 23rd, 10.00 – 11.00.
Location: UMCG, Triadebuilding entrance 24, room k1.25

More and more, researchers are required to share code and enable others to reproduce their results. However, most of us have received little (if any) training on how to code properly, effectively and efficiently, deal with version control, or encounter reproducibility issues due to updating R-packages. On top of that, it can be really scary to share your code, warts and all, even if you think you’ve done a good job. Luckily there are various tools and software to help.

In this workshop, Henk van der Veen, senior software engineer at Roqua, will give an overview how to create and share code in a way that let’s other people (including future you) easily contribute to or reproduce your results. The focus will be on the packrat package in R and github repositories, as two steps in the coding chain. Henk will discuss advantages of a code repository, and explain about branches, pull requests, coding style and code reviews. Bring your laptop to play around with these technologies, and if there is enough time we might do a coding exercise.
IMPORTANT: To make sure we don’t spend 20 minutes on installing everything in the beginning, if you plan to bring your laptop and try the software, please follow these steps before the session (approx. 15 min): https://hampei.github.io/rstuff/install_quick.html. If you run into trouble/have any questions contact me (Daan) or Henk.

Best,

Daan Orneé